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Home » On raising troops and holding an election in Tennessee Abraham Lincoln, 3 July 1862 LINCOLN, Abraham (1809-1865). Autograph letter signed as President (“A. Lincoln”) to Andrew Johnson, Washington, 3 July 1862. One page, bifolium, 252 x 198mm, on lined stationery bearing a blind stamp of the Capitol at top left (a few spots of soiling, else very clean and bright).

On raising troops and holding an election in Tennessee Abraham Lincoln, 3 July 1862 LINCOLN, Abraham (1809-1865). Autograph letter signed as President (“A. Lincoln”) to Andrew Johnson, Washington, 3 July 1862. One page, bifolium, 252 x 198mm, on lined stationery bearing a blind stamp of the Capitol at top left (a few spots of soiling, else very clean and bright).

  • Andres G 
  • 7 min read
Andres G

Andres G

BSc, MSc, Expert Appraiser of all kinds of Antique items. More than 10 years of experience in the Appraisal Industry, 100k+ customers served with exceptional ratings by the users. Antique store owner and businessman.

On raising troops and holding an election in Tennessee Abraham Lincoln, 3 July 1862 LINCOLN, Abraham (1809-1865). Autograph letter signed as President (“A. Lincoln”) to Andrew Johnson, Washington, 3 July 1862. One page, bifolium, 252 x 198mm, on lined stationery bearing a blind stamp of the Capitol at top left (a few spots of soiling, else very clean and bright).

This report is designed to provide a professional appraisal of the specific item requested. It contains a detailed description and evaluation of the item, as well as information about the valuation method used. The value given in this appraisal report is applicable only to the item in question and should not be interpreted as a general valuation for any similar items. Values for similar items can vary significantly, ranging from one hundred to one hundred thousand US dollars, depending on subtle details.

This report is intended to give the owner an appraisal of their item’s value, whether it is furniture, china, glassware, or any other type of antique or collectible item. The information provided will help the owner to understand their piece and its value. Furthermore, it provides an appraisal value in US dollars, as well as advice on how to proceed if the owner wishes to sell the item. It should be noted that this report is not intended to encourage the owner to sell their antique item; instead, it seeks to provide information on its value so that the owner can make an informed decision.

Description, identification, provenance reconstruction, age estimation, style and similar items used for comparison.

Identification

As a professional antique appraiser, the process of identifying a specific antique item, such as the autograph letter by Abraham Lincoln from a photograph, requires a detailed and methodical approach. Upon receiving the photograph, the first step is to examine the visual cues closely. The appraiser will assess the design features of the paper, the handwriting style, and the ink used, comparing them to known standards from the historical period in question. The watermark or blind stamp, in this case, that of the Capitol, can offer significant information about the paper's origin and date of manufacture. Simultaneously, the appraiser places the item within its historical context, understanding that a letter from Lincoln during his presidency might discuss topics of national importance and urgency, like raising troops during the Civil War, which aligns with the document's date. The expertise of the appraiser in historical handwriting can be crucial; known samples of Lincoln's handwriting serve as a basis for comparison to confirm authenticity. The appraiser would also consider the document's provenance and any previous records of its existence in public or private collections. Rare documents, like presidential letters, are often well-documented in historic sales or auction records. Furthermore, the appraiser may consult specialized databases or reference experts in presidential memorabilia to verify its authenticity and estimate its value. Through this meticulous process, which includes a thorough examination of the physical attributes, contextual investigation, and provenance verification, the appraiser can deduce the nature of the letter and provide an informed assessment of its authenticity and potential market value. In some cases, if the photograph's detail allows, signs of aging, paper quality, and signs of historical ink consistency can be discerned, adding further proof to the item's legitimacy and aiding in the appraisal process.

Provenance

As an antique appraiser tasked with determining the provenance of the autograph letter signed by President Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson, dated July 3, 1862, I would begin by scrutinizing the photograph of the item for specific details. The photograph would allow me to observe the handwriting, signature style, paper quality, aging characteristics, and the blind stamp of the Capitol—elements that are pivotal in authenticating the piece. To affirm the letter's authenticity, I'd cross-reference the handwriting and signature against known genuine examples of Lincoln's writing. Notably, the date of the letter is historically significant, as it falls during the Civil War—a period when Lincoln would have corresponded with Johnson, who was the military governor of Tennessee at the time. The physical characteristics described in the appraisal report, such as the paper's dimensions, the presence of a blind stamp of the Capitol, and lineation, are crucial design elements that align with the stationary of the period. I would compare these details with archival materials from the same era. Documentary evidence might include historical records from Lincoln's presidential archives or Johnson's gubernatorial papers that reference the content or existence of such a letter. If available, provenance records, such as past auction results or library holdings, can trace ownership history. Assessing the craftsmanship would include examining the writing style, ink properties, and folding marks, which might indicate historical handling and use. A detailed analysis of the 'few spots of soiling' mentioned could provide insights into the letter's journey and conditions it was subjected to over time. Contemporary reports or recorded events involving Lincoln and Johnson would also provide historical context, helping to verify the subject matter of the letter—raising troops and holding an election in Tennessee, which addresses key military and political actions during the Civil War. Lastly, provenance involves an object's ownership history. In this case, investigation into subsequent owners of the letter since 1862 would be pursued. We would seek previous sale records, inheritance documentation, or mentions in historical inventories, which might establish a chain of custody. Altogether, through meticulous examination of the photograph, historical comparison, documentation review, and contextual alignment, I would piece together the provenance of this significant historical artifact, providing assurance of its authenticity and value to potential collectors or scholars.

Age

As a professional appraiser, determining the age of a specific antique item, such as a historical document like the autograph letter signed by President Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson dated July 3, 1862, requires careful consideration of several factors. One of the primary methods for authenticating and dating an antique document is examining its construction techniques, including the paper type, writing instruments used, and the folding marks which may indicate historical mailing practices. The materials used in the document, such as the ink composition and the paper's quality, can be assessed using various chemical tests and magnification tools to identify characteristics consistent with 19th-century items. In addition, the design elements, such as the letterhead with a blind stamp of the Capitol, should be evaluated for its authenticity. I would cross-reference it with known examples from the era to confirm its legitimacy and typical use during that time frame. The historical context is an essential factor in age determination. The content of the letter, mentioning the raising of troops and holding an election in Tennessee, corresponds to Civil War events around that period, providing a temporal anchor for the appraisal. Furthermore, I would analyze any available documentation or provenance associated with the letter. Archival research to match handwriting, signatures, and paper trail authenticates the piece and could offer additional insight into its timeline. Any previous appraisals or academic studies on similar documents by Lincoln can be instrumental in establishing a comparative framework. Lastly, markings on the item, such as the autograph and signature, are significant indicators of age. Comparing Lincoln's handwriting to other verified documents from various points in his life helps pinpoint the document's origin within his presidency. Additionally, markings or endorsements by third parties may reveal the document's chain of custody and thus support the item's historical narrative. Through a synthesis of these methods and considerations—evaluating construction techniques, materials used, design elements, historical context, and existing documentation or markings—I would build a comprehensive picture of the item's provenance and provide an informed estimate of its age.

Style

As a professional appraiser, upon examining the autograph letter signed by President Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson dated 3 July 1862, I can discern several characteristics indicative of its historical and cultural context. The physical attributes of the letter—composed on a bifolium measuring 252 by 198mm—suggest a formal communication, a common practice of the period. Lined stationery was a standard feature of the era, enhancing legibility and conveying a sense of order, valued during the tumultuous times of the Civil War. The presence of a blind stamp of the Capitol at the top left corner is particularly significant. Not only does this element authenticate the document's governmental origin, but it also symbolizes the authority of the Union at a critical juncture in American history. This emblem serves as a subtle assertion of national unity and governance, aspects that were fundamentally challenged during the secession crisis. In terms of technique, the autograph itself signifies the personalized attention that Lincoln paid to correspondences of critical importance. His penmanship reflects the 19th-century Spencerian script's influence—a style known for its elegance and clarity—which was widely taught and esteemed in the United States during Lincoln's time. The content of the letter, dealing with raising troops and holding an election in Tennessee, not only emphasizes Lincoln's hands-on approach to governing during the war but also highlights his focus on restoring Union control and democratic processes in the war-torn states. Andrew Johnson, the recipient, who later became Lincoln's Vice President and eventually the 17th President of the United States after Lincoln's assassination, was a Southern Unionist. His role in Tennessee was integral to Lincoln's strategy for reconstruction, making the letter a document of great political and military strategy significance. In summary, an appraisal of this item must consider its national significance, material elements, and the historical moment it represents—exemplifying the complex interplay between personal presidential communication, the stature of written correspondence during the 19th century, and the poignant context of the American Civil War. The letter would hold immense value for collectors and historians alike, as it is a tangible link to a critical moment in the life of one of America's most revered Presidents and a pivotal point in the nation's history.

Similar Items Used for Comparison Purposes

Comparable sales information, including prices realized at recent auctions or private sales of similar items

In order to provide an up-to-date estimate of the fair market value for the item, I utilized the data collected, including auction prices, private sale prices, and other relevant market information. This is crucial as it can be used in various contexts such as insurance, estate planning, and art market analysis. It also offers a valuable insight into how the valuation of the item may have changed due to environmental or economic factors.

The auction prices and private sale prices were a significant factor in determining the current market value of the item, as they are based on actual transactions between buyers and sellers in the market. As such, they are a strong indicator of the expected value of the piece in the near future. By analyzing auction results and private sale prices from the last 6 months, I was able to accurately determine the current fair market value of the item.

This approach provides a comprehensive view of how the value has changed over time and gives insight into any potential areas of appreciation or depreciation in its price. Additionally, it allows me to adjust my valuation as new auction prices and private sale prices become available.

Conclusion

As a professional appraiser, upon examining the autograph letter signed by President Abraham Lincoln to Andrew Johnson dated 3 July 1862, I can discern several characteristics indicative of its historical and cultural context. The physical attributes of the letter—composed on a bifolium measuring 252 by 198mm—suggest a formal communication, a common practice of the period. Lined stationery was a standard feature of the era, enhancing legibility and conveying a sense of order, valued during the tumultuous times of the Civil War. The presence of a blind stamp of the Capitol at the top left corner is particularly significant. Not only does this element authenticate the document's governmental origin, but it also symbolizes the authority of the Union at a critical juncture in American history. This emblem serves as a subtle assertion of national unity and governance, aspects that were fundamentally challenged during the secession crisis. In terms of technique, the autograph itself signifies the personalized attention that Lincoln paid to correspondences of critical importance. His penmanship reflects the 19th-century Spencerian script's influence—a style known for its elegance and clarity—which was widely taught and esteemed in the United States during Lincoln's time. The content of the letter, dealing with raising troops and holding an election in Tennessee, not only emphasizes Lincoln's hands-on approach to governing during the war but also highlights his focus on restoring Union control and democratic processes in the war-torn states. Andrew Johnson, the recipient, who later became Lincoln's Vice President and eventually the 17th President of the United States after Lincoln's assassination, was a Southern Unionist. His role in Tennessee was integral to Lincoln's strategy for reconstruction, making the letter a document of great political and military strategy significance. In summary, an appraisal of this item must consider its national significance, material elements, and the historical moment it represents—exemplifying the complex interplay between personal presidential communication, the stature of written correspondence during the 19th century, and the poignant context of the American Civil War. The letter would hold immense value for collectors and historians alike, as it is a tangible link to a critical moment in the life of one of America's most revered Presidents and a pivotal point in the nation's history.

Appraisal Value ($)

$90,000

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Custom made Ad Copy Text

Step into the annals of American history with this extraordinary piece of our nation's past. Behold an authentic autograph letter signed by President Abraham Lincoln himself, a tangible connection to the pivotal moments that shaped the United States. Dated 3 July 1862 and addressed to Andrew Johnson, this document is not merely writing on paper; it is a powerful relic of a time when the country was gripped by civil war and leadership decisions altered the fate of generations. The letter's distinguished provenance is further accentuated by the emblematic blind stamp of the Capitol, making this a rare jewel for both collectors and enthusiasts of American history. Crafted with meticulous penmanship, this letter is a testament to the artistry and importance of communication during Lincoln's presidency. The textured lined stationery and Lincoln's own unmistakable signature offer a transcendent visual experience, allowing you to trace the same lines that were penned by one of the most venerated figures in American lore. Little more than a few spots of soiling stand testament to the letter's journey through time, yet it remains remarkably clean and bright, as if eager to reflect its historical gravitas. Every fold and character of this antique item embodies the rarity and beauty of a bygone era, inviting you to own a picturesque piece of American history.

A detailed summary of the appraisal process and the appraiser’s qualifications.

Mark-to-market appraisal is a vital method for determining the current value of an item. This form of valuation requires an appraiser to consider various factors, such as market conditions, the condition and age of the item, and its rarity. By taking all these elements into account, a mark-to-market appraisal delivers an accurate assessment of an item’s current market value.

The item’s rarity, as determined by its availability and demand, is also considered in mark-to-market appraisal. Appraisers use this information to determine if the value of a piece is likely to increase or decrease over time. Additionally, they will inspect the condition of the item and note any signs of wear or damage that might affect its future resale value.

When performing mark-to-market appraisals, appraisers also consider market conditions by researching current market trends and comparable items that have recently sold. This information is used to provide an estimate of an item’s worth at that point in time. By considering all of these factors, mark-to-market appraisal is able to give a reliable indication of the current value of an item. This kind of valuation can also ensure fair prices are paid and received when buying or selling items.

In summary, mark-to-market appraisal is a crucial tool for determining the true value of an item, enabling buyers, sellers, and appraisers to make informed decisions regarding its worth. It takes into account multiple aspects to provide an accurate assessment of the current market value of an item. This information can be used to ensure that buyers and sellers are getting a fair price for the item, and that the appraiser’s valuation is up-to-date and reflective of current market conditions.

In the case of insurance replacement appraisals, mark-to-market appraisals can also be used to accurately estimate the cost of replacing a lost or damaged item. The current value, as determined by the appraisal, is then used to determine the amount that the insurance company will pay back to the policyholder. This way, policyholders can rest assured that they will receive an appropriate sum for any item that needs to be replaced due to accidental damage or theft. Additionally, this kind of valuation helps insurers ensure they are not being overcharged when items need to be replaced as part of a claim settlement.

The appraisal process is a thorough evaluation of the item or items in question. It involves researching and analyzing the information provided by the requester in order to provide an accurate estimate of its value. The appraiser takes into account factors such as condition, rarity, demand, and market prices. Photographs and detailed descriptions are especially important when providing an appraisal, since they help the appraiser identify any potential flaws or defects that could affect the item’s worth. By using all the resources that are available, an evaluation can be done quickly, efficiently, and with a high level of accuracy.

A statement of the appraiser’s liability and any potential conflicts of interest.

A qualified appraisal, also known as a formal written evaluation, is a professional assessment of the monetary value of an item by an individual who has specialized knowledge, expertise, and training in the field of appraisals. This person must meet certain educational and professional requirements, including experience in researching and evaluating items, as well as knowledge of the market and current market trends. The purpose of a qualified appraisal is to provide an objective and unbiased opinion of the value of an item for various purposes, including insurance claims, tax planning, estate planning, or to help determine a fair price for a sale or purchase.

We are committed to providing our clients with the most accurate and unbiased appraisal reports. To ensure impartiality, we adopt a flat rate, fixed fee structure for all appraisals, instead of a percentage-based fee. This eliminates any potential conflicts of interest between the appraiser and the final report value. Our appraisal reports are in compliance with the Appraisal Foundation’s USPAP (Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice) standards and guidelines, which are widely accepted as the ethical and performance standards for appraisers. This guarantees that our reports are of high quality and legally defensible.