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Home » A rectangular-cut gemstone sapphire. Celon/Pale Sapphire Weight 10 ctw LWUV – PINK FLORECENCEA rectangular-cut gemstone sapphire. SHOWS GREEN UNDER CHELEA FILTER Celon/Pale Sapphire. Vintage circa mid 20thC.

A rectangular-cut gemstone sapphire. Celon/Pale Sapphire Weight 10 ctw LWUV – PINK FLORECENCEA rectangular-cut gemstone sapphire. SHOWS GREEN UNDER CHELEA FILTER Celon/Pale Sapphire. Vintage circa mid 20thC.

  • Andres G 
  • 7 min read
Andres G

Andres G

BSc, MSc, Expert Appraiser of all kinds of Antique items. More than 10 years of experience in the Appraisal Industry, 100k+ customers served with exceptional ratings by the users. Antique store owner and businessman.

A rectangular-cut gemstone sapphire. Celon/Pale Sapphire Weight 10 ctw LWUV – PINK FLORECENCEA rectangular-cut gemstone sapphire. SHOWS GREEN UNDER CHELEA FILTER Celon/Pale Sapphire. Vintage circa mid 20thC.

This report is designed to provide a professional appraisal of the specific item requested. It contains a detailed description and evaluation of the item, as well as information about the valuation method used. The value given in this appraisal report is applicable only to the item in question and should not be interpreted as a general valuation for any similar items. Values for similar items can vary significantly, ranging from one hundred to one hundred thousand US dollars, depending on subtle details.

This report is intended to give the owner an appraisal of their item’s value, whether it is furniture, china, glassware, or any other type of antique or collectible item. The information provided will help the owner to understand their piece and its value. Furthermore, it provides an appraisal value in US dollars, as well as advice on how to proceed if the owner wishes to sell the item. It should be noted that this report is not intended to encourage the owner to sell their antique item; instead, it seeks to provide information on its value so that the owner can make an informed decision.

Description, identification, provenance reconstruction, age estimation, style and similar items used for comparison.

Identification

As an antique appraiser, the first step in identifying a specific antique gemstone like a rectangular-cut Ceylon sapphire from a photograph involves scrutinizing elements such as design, cut, color, and any unique optical phenomena it may exhibit. While a picture can give preliminary information, physical examination is often necessary for a conclusive appraisal. Starting with design, I assess the cut of the sapphire—the geometry, facet structure, and finishing details—which can provide clues to the era of cutting and possible treatments. For instance, an "antique cut" might indicate an earlier period, whereas a "modern cut" would align more with mid-20th-century origins. Ceylon sapphires are famed for their light to medium tones and vibrant colors, which can range from pale to rich blues; paleness might suggest either a lower saturation of color or potential fading over time, possibly due to sunlight or other factors. The mention of pink fluorescence under long-wave ultraviolet (LWUV) lighting is significant; natural sapphires can exhibit this, helping to confirm the gem’s authenticity, as synthetic or treated sapphires often have different fluorescent qualities. However, true identification of this feature requires an in-person test with proper LWUV equipment, as photography is not enough to accurately discern fluorescence. When it’s indicated that the sapphire shows green under the Chelsea filter, this points to potential chromium content, suggesting the presence of natural sapphire since synthetic stones typically do not show this green reaction. Moreover, not all natural sapphires will show this either, it's indicative of certain trace elements in Ceylon sapphires, which enhance their value if confirmed. To place the sapphire in historical context, I would research cutting styles, treatments, and market patterns from the mid-20th century, corresponding to when the sapphire is purported to be from. Reviewing the craftsmanship can include evaluating the quality and style of any associated settings or jewelry pieces, if present. Lastly, provenance and documentation can greatly assist in authentication. Records of ownership, laboratory reports, or purchase receipts can provide valuable information about the gemstone's origin and history. In the absence of such documentation, professional gemological testing may be critical for determining the nature of the gemstone, especially for high-value items such as a 10-carat Ceylon sapphire. In sum, while a photograph offers a starting point for appraisal, it is the combination of direct examination, historical knowledge, and sometimes scientific testing that enables an appraiser to make a well-informed determination about the nature and authenticity of an antique gemstone.

Provenance

As a professional antique appraiser evaluating the provenance of a specific gemstone—identified in the report as a "rectangular-cut gemstone sapphire, Ceylon/Pale Sapphire, weight 10 ctw, LWUV – pink fluorescence, shows green under Chelsea filter, vintage circa mid-20th century"—there are several critical factors and methods to consider based on the photograph and the provided information. Firstly, the physical characteristics of the sapphire are paramount. Using the photograph as an initial reference, I would assess the cut, color, and clarity, which can provide insight into the historical and geographical origins of the stone. The description of the stone's reaction to long-wave ultraviolet light (LWUV) and the Chelsea filter, which indicates pink fluorescence and a green response respectively, is particularly telling. This reaction can help confirm that this is indeed a natural sapphire and may suggest a Ceylonese origin, as stones from this region are known for such properties. I would cross-referenced the cut and aesthetic appeal of the stone with known trends in gemstone fashion and cutting techniques during the mid-20th century to establish a rough date of when the sapphire might have been faceted. Provenance involves piecing together a historical narrative, so understanding the shift in gemstone cutting styles and the economic context during the mentioned era will provide clues to its origin story. I would look at the craftsmanship, identifying any unique characteristics in the cut that could point to a specific location or artisan. Ceylonese cutters often have traditional techniques inherited through generations, which may be noticeable in the facets and overall symmetry of the stone. For a more comprehensive evaluation, I would request any existing documentation—such as trade receipts, previous appraisals, or written historical accounts—that may accompany the sapphire. Provenance is significantly bolstered by direct historical evidence that establishes a chain of ownership or origin. If available, I'd review previous sales records or auction catalogues for similar stones that could offer comparative context, not only for valuation but also to corroborate its provenance. Interviews with prior owners or experts who specialize in mid-20th century gemstones may also prove invaluable for providing personal accounts or recognized expertise that support the stone's history. Finally, I may also consider collaborating with a gemologist who specializes in vintage gemstones to conduct further scientific testing if necessary. Such tests might include advanced spectroscopy or X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to pinpoint the chemical makeup and, by extension, the likely geographic origin of the sapphire. Authentication of the stone’s age and geographic origin would help in understanding its journey through time and possibly its past ownership, thereby piecing together a comprehensive provenance narrative.

Age

As a professional appraiser evaluating the age of a specific antique rectangular-cut Ceylon sapphire, there are several methods and factors I must consider. Initially, I would examine the construction techniques involved in the cutting and shaping of the gemstone. Traditionally, older stones often feature cutting styles that differ from modern techniques due to technological advancements; thus, the facets, symmetry, and polish can provide clues to the stone's era. Furthermore, I would assess the materials, particularly the chemical composition and inclusions within the sapphire, which could hint at historical mining methods and sources. Design elements are also pivotal; the cut of the gemstone often reflects the aesthetic preferences of the period of its creation. For instance, an 'emerald-cut' often suggests an Art Deco influence, which would link the sapphire to the early to mid-20th century. The presence of pink fluorescence under long-wave ultraviolet light could indicate specific geological formations common in certain eras or locations, and the characteristic green color displayed under the Chelsea filter suggests that the stone has not been subjected to certain modern treatments, thus pointing towards vintage status. I would also closely inspect any available documentation or markings that might accompany the gemstone. Provenance, labor certificates, or historical sales records can often provide conclusive evidence of the stone’s age. Additionally, inscriptions or engravings on any setting (if present) can sometimes be dated by script style or hallmark analysis. Historical context is crucial, as it may inform us about the mining, cutting, and commercial practices of the era in which the sapphire is believed to have originated; this might include geopolitical considerations (such as accessibility of mines in Ceylon—modern-day Sri Lanka—during certain historical periods) or market trends that affected the availability and popularity of certain gem types. In conclusion, a combination of technical analysis, stylistic evaluation, and historical research would all be utilized to accurately determine the age of the Ceylon sapphire. Each aspect would provide valuable insights, contributing to a comprehensive appraisal and a more precise estimation of the gemstone's vintage, circling around the mid-20th century as initially suggested.

Style

As a professional appraiser, upon examining the characteristics of this mid-20th century Ceylon pale sapphire, several factors stand out that underscore its style and origins. The rectangular cut, often referred to as an emerald cut, is indicative of a period where clean lines and symmetry were revered, reflecting the Art Deco movement that continued to influence jewelry design into the mid-1900s. This particular shape enhances the sapphire's luster and showcases its clarity, which is a defining feature of Ceylon (Sri Lankan) sapphires, renowned for their fine qualities and lighter tones. The pale hue of the sapphire, coupled with the LWUV – pink fluorescence, suggests the presence of trace elements like iron and titanium in lower concentrations, which are typical in Ceylon sapphires and contribute to its distinct coloration. This fluorescence under long-wave ultraviolet light can often increase its desirability, as it is a unique feature that can authenticate the stone's origin and add to its allure. Moreover, the observation that it shows a green color under the Chelsea filter is significant, as this is a classic diagnostic tool that indicates the natural origin of the sapphire and distinguishes it from synthetic counterparts which would typically exhibit a red reaction due to the absence of chromium. The vintage provenance of the sapphire, rooted in the culture-rich soils of Ceylon, now known as Sri Lanka, adds to its cultural significance. Sri Lanka has a storied history of gemstone mining and trading that dates back to antiquity, often referred to as 'Ratna-Dweepa' or the 'Island of Gems' in ancient texts, which speaks to the deep heritage and expertise in producing such exquisite gemstones. This Ceylon pale sapphire's characteristics not only provide insights into its geographic and geological origins but also reflect the artistic preferences and craftsmanship of the period in which it was fashioned. It stands as both a beautiful piece of vintage jewelry and a historic artifact representing the enduring legacy of Sri Lankan gemology and mid-20th-century design elements.

Similar Items Used for Comparison Purposes

Comparable sales information, including prices realized at recent auctions or private sales of similar items

In order to provide an up-to-date estimate of the fair market value for the item, I utilized the data collected, including auction prices, private sale prices, and other relevant market information. This is crucial as it can be used in various contexts such as insurance, estate planning, and art market analysis. It also offers a valuable insight into how the valuation of the item may have changed due to environmental or economic factors.

The auction prices and private sale prices were a significant factor in determining the current market value of the item, as they are based on actual transactions between buyers and sellers in the market. As such, they are a strong indicator of the expected value of the piece in the near future. By analyzing auction results and private sale prices from the last 6 months, I was able to accurately determine the current fair market value of the item.

This approach provides a comprehensive view of how the value has changed over time and gives insight into any potential areas of appreciation or depreciation in its price. Additionally, it allows me to adjust my valuation as new auction prices and private sale prices become available.

Conclusion

As a professional appraiser, upon examining the characteristics of this mid-20th century Ceylon pale sapphire, several factors stand out that underscore its style and origins. The rectangular cut, often referred to as an emerald cut, is indicative of a period where clean lines and symmetry were revered, reflecting the Art Deco movement that continued to influence jewelry design into the mid-1900s. This particular shape enhances the sapphire's luster and showcases its clarity, which is a defining feature of Ceylon (Sri Lankan) sapphires, renowned for their fine qualities and lighter tones. The pale hue of the sapphire, coupled with the LWUV – pink fluorescence, suggests the presence of trace elements like iron and titanium in lower concentrations, which are typical in Ceylon sapphires and contribute to its distinct coloration. This fluorescence under long-wave ultraviolet light can often increase its desirability, as it is a unique feature that can authenticate the stone's origin and add to its allure. Moreover, the observation that it shows a green color under the Chelsea filter is significant, as this is a classic diagnostic tool that indicates the natural origin of the sapphire and distinguishes it from synthetic counterparts which would typically exhibit a red reaction due to the absence of chromium. The vintage provenance of the sapphire, rooted in the culture-rich soils of Ceylon, now known as Sri Lanka, adds to its cultural significance. Sri Lanka has a storied history of gemstone mining and trading that dates back to antiquity, often referred to as 'Ratna-Dweepa' or the 'Island of Gems' in ancient texts, which speaks to the deep heritage and expertise in producing such exquisite gemstones. This Ceylon pale sapphire's characteristics not only provide insights into its geographic and geological origins but also reflect the artistic preferences and craftsmanship of the period in which it was fashioned. It stands as both a beautiful piece of vintage jewelry and a historic artifact representing the enduring legacy of Sri Lankan gemology and mid-20th-century design elements.

Appraisal Value ($)

$55,000

Appraisal Report made by:

Andrés Gómez

BSc, MSc, Expert Art Appraiser

10+ years of experience in online antique and collectible appraisals.
100k+ Customers Served.
Antique Store Owner.
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https://www.appraisily.com/andres-portofolio/

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Custom made Ad Copy Text

Delve into the enchanting allure of a mid-20th-century Ceylon Sapphire, a gemstone steeped in history and renowned for its ethereal pale hue that whispers tales of ancient kingdoms and long-lost treasures. This mesmerizing 10-carat treasure is not just a statement of luxury; its pink fluorescence under long-wave ultraviolet light is a rare dance of nature's brilliance, a captivating phenomenon that elevates this jewel to the realm of the extraordinary. With its serene color that hints at secret gardens and tranquil seas, this Ceylon Sapphire is a poetic emblem of grace, perfect for the discerning collector who seeks a gem with a legacy as illustrious as its appearance. Unveil the secrets held within this exquisite Ceylon Sapphire, a gem that reveals its true mystique under the enigmatic light of a Chelsea filter, which unveils a fascinating green glow—indicative of its authenticity and the meticulous craftsmanship with which it has been fashioned. Accentuating its allure is the geometric precision of its rectangular cut, which showcases the sapphire's depth and the fluid play of light across its facets, making it a standout piece in any collection. This vintage gem encapsulates the pinnacle of rarity and is an heirloom in the making, offering not just an investment but a bounty of beauty and a fragment of a bygone era, waiting to be cherished and showcased by those with a keen eye for the rare and the beautiful.

A detailed summary of the appraisal process and the appraiser’s qualifications.

Mark-to-market appraisal is a vital method for determining the current value of an item. This form of valuation requires an appraiser to consider various factors, such as market conditions, the condition and age of the item, and its rarity. By taking all these elements into account, a mark-to-market appraisal delivers an accurate assessment of an item’s current market value.

The item’s rarity, as determined by its availability and demand, is also considered in mark-to-market appraisal. Appraisers use this information to determine if the value of a piece is likely to increase or decrease over time. Additionally, they will inspect the condition of the item and note any signs of wear or damage that might affect its future resale value.

When performing mark-to-market appraisals, appraisers also consider market conditions by researching current market trends and comparable items that have recently sold. This information is used to provide an estimate of an item’s worth at that point in time. By considering all of these factors, mark-to-market appraisal is able to give a reliable indication of the current value of an item. This kind of valuation can also ensure fair prices are paid and received when buying or selling items.

In summary, mark-to-market appraisal is a crucial tool for determining the true value of an item, enabling buyers, sellers, and appraisers to make informed decisions regarding its worth. It takes into account multiple aspects to provide an accurate assessment of the current market value of an item. This information can be used to ensure that buyers and sellers are getting a fair price for the item, and that the appraiser’s valuation is up-to-date and reflective of current market conditions.

In the case of insurance replacement appraisals, mark-to-market appraisals can also be used to accurately estimate the cost of replacing a lost or damaged item. The current value, as determined by the appraisal, is then used to determine the amount that the insurance company will pay back to the policyholder. This way, policyholders can rest assured that they will receive an appropriate sum for any item that needs to be replaced due to accidental damage or theft. Additionally, this kind of valuation helps insurers ensure they are not being overcharged when items need to be replaced as part of a claim settlement.

The appraisal process is a thorough evaluation of the item or items in question. It involves researching and analyzing the information provided by the requester in order to provide an accurate estimate of its value. The appraiser takes into account factors such as condition, rarity, demand, and market prices. Photographs and detailed descriptions are especially important when providing an appraisal, since they help the appraiser identify any potential flaws or defects that could affect the item’s worth. By using all the resources that are available, an evaluation can be done quickly, efficiently, and with a high level of accuracy.

A statement of the appraiser’s liability and any potential conflicts of interest.

A qualified appraisal, also known as a formal written evaluation, is a professional assessment of the monetary value of an item by an individual who has specialized knowledge, expertise, and training in the field of appraisals. This person must meet certain educational and professional requirements, including experience in researching and evaluating items, as well as knowledge of the market and current market trends. The purpose of a qualified appraisal is to provide an objective and unbiased opinion of the value of an item for various purposes, including insurance claims, tax planning, estate planning, or to help determine a fair price for a sale or purchase.

We are committed to providing our clients with the most accurate and unbiased appraisal reports. To ensure impartiality, we adopt a flat rate, fixed fee structure for all appraisals, instead of a percentage-based fee. This eliminates any potential conflicts of interest between the appraiser and the final report value. Our appraisal reports are in compliance with the Appraisal Foundation’s USPAP (Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice) standards and guidelines, which are widely accepted as the ethical and performance standards for appraisers. This guarantees that our reports are of high quality and legally defensible.