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A Regular Print After Pablo Picasso

Maker: After Pablo Picasso
Title: Peace Circle, 446/500
Circa: 1954
Location: United States
Medium: Print
Size: 26″ x 20″

This is a professional appraisal report, provided upon request. In this report, I researched and interpreted information provided by the requester. The appraisal report contains different sections to complete the description, identification, and appraisal of this artwork ( A Regular Print After Pablo Picasso ). Extra information like provenance, author, style of painting, date, appraisal method (Mark to Market Valuation) and recommended venues to pursue selling.

This report is designed to give you an appraisal value for the artwork you own, whether it is a painting, sculpture, or another type of art. The information provided will help you to understand your piece and its value. I use the world reserve currency (US dollars) to appraise each artwork. The selection aims to avoid currency risk variations that could affect appraisals over time. This report is not intended to encourage you to sell your art; rather, it aims to provide information on your art’s value, so that you know what steps to take if you do wish to sell. It is recommended to update the reports (if for insurance) every three years, to reflect changes in the market and account for inflation.

Description, research and provenance of A Regular Print After Pablo Picasso

Image Recognition with Artificial Intelligence

To investigate this work of art, I used image recognition with artificial intelligence to try to find the first clues. Image recognition, in the context of machine vision, is the ability of software to identify artworks, objects, places, people, shapes, or forms. Computers can use machine vision technologies based on artificial intelligence software to find images similar to the input picture. A specialized program is used to determine whether the front photograph of the artwork is available on the internet. The software takes the picture as an input, compares it with millions of other works in the database, and outputs similar images. This software will be useful later to determine the origin of the art piece. For clatification, the input image is a frontal picture, straight, leveled and filtered image of your artwork. The results of the automatic recognition are not conclusive. If a match is found, it will be shown below:

What specific information can we obtain from this test?

The algorithm found an exact match. Though the results are not conclusive and I need to obtain more information, an exact match is normally associated with prints. In this case, it is important to determine the type of print, edition, and identification. In most cases, the results can be correlated with a limited edition print, a print that was hand signed by the original artist of the painting. However, regular prints (a poster) can also be a perfect fit with the results. To conclude exactly what this artwork is, I need to continue with the research and inspection workflow.

We have certificate of this print that we can use to gather more information.

Signature Investigation

In this part, I study and research the signature of the artwork. I used a larger picture of the signature and try to interpret it.

A picture of the signature and/or back (if relevant) is depicted below:

The signature is what you would expect from Pablo Picasso. Let’s take a look at the certificate:

It is really uncommon that a regular print has a certificate. A regular print is a copy, a reproduction, or a poster. Logically, a certificate of authenticity for a copy or a reproduction makes no sense. I find the certificate misleading since it tries to represent a regular print as if it were a limited edition hand-signed print.

The terms used in the Certificate are really technical. We can read the print is described as a “signed in plate print”. This means the signature is printed, either with a lithographic technique or a modern inkjet printer. So the signature doesn’t add any value at all.

A limited edition print is typically hand-signed by the original artist of the painting or print and labeled with the number of the print created during the run, followed by the size of the print run as a whole. The format often takes the form of XXX/YYY where XXX’s and YYY’s are numbers. The term “limited edition” is very often employed as a synonym for a hand- signed print. That’s why I think the certificate is fraudulent and purposely confusing since it looks like a hand-signed print, yet the signature is part of the print itself.

In the artist Certificate part, we can also see the word “After.” Again, this word means that it is a copy of that artist’s work. So even if it is a lithograph and printed, it has nothing to do with Picasso, except that someone printed one of his artworks.

Finally, I think that it makes no sense to have a Certificate of Authenticity for a regular reproduction. The way the certificate is written proposes that a potential buyer could think the print is a hand signed limited edition print. Keep in mind that a limited edition print is much more valuable than a regular print.

To value this lithograph, I used a mark-to-market valuation method like that of a regular lithograph (I find the certificate doesn’t add any value to it).

Medium, frame construction, style and frame

Now that I have more information about the artist, I can check if the style and type of painting matches the artist referenced. An artist may change painting style, scenes and compositions with time, so I checked similar paintings during the whole lifetime of the artist. In this test, I would expect to find similar known paintings made by this artist. 

Another important point is to date the painting and check if the frame construction technique, medium used, and colors match the lifetime period of the artist. There are many variables in this step, so I will explain this with an example so you can understand the purpose of this part. I check the frame construction for small details, like the type of metallic parts used, if the wood joints and cuts are irregular, or if the wood cuts were machined. Small details can help to determine the age of the painting. For instance, a frame construction that includes modern metallic pieces like flat-head nails, staples, or Phillips-head screws can be dated circa 20th Century. Older frames comprise the use of irregular wood cuts (hand made) and hand forged metallic parts. In some cases, you can see the absence of metallic parts. This is only an example of the frame construction, but I also consider the type of medium used and the color palette.

I think it was printed quite recently, probably circa late 20th century. I find this is a regular print, so its value is really similar to a poster or a decorative print.

Conclusion

I think this artwork is interesting for decorators only.

A Regular Print After Pablo Picasso : Final Appraisal Value ($)

80-100$

Appraisal Report made by:

Andrés Gómez

BSc, MSc, Expert Art Appraiser

10+ year of Experience in Online Art Appraisals.
100k+ Customers Served.
Antique Store Owner.
You can check my portofolio of past appraisals here:

https://www.appraisily.com/andres-portofolio/

Signature:

Pictures received

We have Experts online now.

How to sell it

Antiques, art, and other collectibles are difficult items to sell online. This can take a lot of time. Be patient, but also make sure that the price you are asking for is the right one for your pieces of art. Consider the following tips on how to sell antiques and collectibles online. These tips will help maximize the price of your antique or collectible.

I would recommend selling it online, there are many ways to do this, for instance: Post an ad on Craigslist. Use eBay to sell antiques online. Post a listing on the Etsy marketplace. Sell with direct messages using Instagram. Create a website using Squarespace or WordPress. Use Shopify to sell via a website, POS and social channels. List your items on Bonanza.com, Facebook Marketplaces or Amazon Marketplace. The higher number of ads the better, if you don’t have time, I would recommend to start with Facebook, Etsy and Amazon.

The key to selling antiques on-line is to let potential customers know that you know what you are talking about. It’s much more difficult to sell something when the potential buyer can’t be sure it is authentic. Sellers should use a well thought out descriptive guides, like this report. A good lead generation service should be helpful in establishing these relationships with online buyers, and an effective way to do this is through a classified ads. If a buyer asks for more information, giving them some valuable facts well ahead of time will get you more sales because your reputation increases and real customers are the ones who ask for more details.

In order to sell your Antiques online, you will need to create a profile on the relevant forum (Etsy, Amazon and FB). Make sure you add a high-resolution image of the product (include at least 3 detailed photos) and add some text. The text should be informative and straight to the point, nothing fancy or fluffy.

Asking price is a big factor to sell your antique. If your asking price is too high (fancy company stickers, missing parts, or chip paint) you are unlikely to get many bids. If the asking price is too low it will cost you money for repairs, shipping, and insurance. As a general rule, I would recommend setting an asking price that is 80% of the value of this report, so you will make the listing attractive from the beginning.

About the valuation method

To value this item I have considered the results from past auction sales. Keep in mind that the final price can be different from asking prices that you can find on the internet. You can see ads on the internet with different asking prices. However, a very high asking price doesn’t normally find cash from a buyer.

That’s why our method comprises searching and comparing similar past sale results that had a buyer. That’s why we can provide an accurate estimation of this item.

For art pieces, remember that it isn’t the same a print, a limited edition print or an original art piece. If the artist can’t be identified, the value assigned corresponds to the quality and potential interest of the market for the painting.

To value this item I have considered the results from past auction sales. Keep in mind that the final price can be different from asking prices that you can find on the internet. You can see ads on the internet with different asking prices. However, a very high asking price doesn’t normally find cash from a buyer. That’s why our method comprises searching and comparing similar past sale results that had a buyer. That’s why we can provide an accurate estimation of this item.

Trying to determine likely interests and tastes of a broad market can be tricky. Works by a lesser-known artist may reveal greater interest to collectors than you might expect, but it is difficult to know without some market research. The same applies for artists who have works in the major museums or galleries but whose work doesn’t command large prices at auction or from dealers. Do not confuse print original limited edition. Be aware that the value of a piece of art is linked to the artist’s name and reputation. The quality of the work of art, its potential interest, are also major factors in its evaluation.

Quality art can be a good investment, but a large print or lithograph might not be as valuable. There are many different kinds of prints. An original piece of art has the highest value, followed by limited edition prints, which have a set number of prints produced.

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